Aotearoa is not for sale!

For those of intending to go to this demo please make a placard for KASM. Kiwi’s against seabed mining. If you make a photo and send a message to the contact page of http://kasm.weebly.com/ I’ll give you an email address to send it to and we will post it on the website.

 

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Dredging Namibia’s phosphate dredge

Seabed mining threatening the Namibian coast:

The incongruous connection between a comforting bowl of breakfast cereal and marine mining was triggered by reading a public document: one which announces that an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) recently lodged with Government by an Australian mining company shows that ‘ …there are presently no identified issues of environmental significance to preclude the dredging of phosphate-enriched sediments (off the Namibian coast) ’
No living thing – including oats – can exist without phosphorus. Fertile soils are rich in the stuff as well as several other elements essential for plant (and human) survival. Feeding a rapidly expanding human population is not easy: it demands massive-scale land clearing for irrigation, eye-bulging rates of water abstraction and – as soils become drained of vital nutrients – the increasing necessity to apply phosphorous-based fertilisers. Thus, mining phosphorus has become synonymous with global food security.
Land-based sources of phosphate-rich rock are running out and it’s estimated that by 2035 demand will have exceeded supply. Clearly, in order to keep hunger at bay, new sources of phosphorus have to be exploited and, whether we like it or not, the seabed’s where it’s at.
The phosphate mining EIA acknowledges that dredging Namibian marine sediments will destroy seabed habitats and that the re-suspension and re-disposition of sediments into the water column will threaten biodiversity within the mined area (a total of 60 km2 over 20 years). These impacts alone undermine the Ministry of Fishery’s policy to embrace an ‘ecosystem approach’ to management: one that is precautionary in nature and recognizes that – due to limited knowledge regarding species composition and marine biogeochemical processes – any habitat or species in each distinct marine zone demands protection. We know very little about the vast and diverse populations of microbes that thrive at the surface of and deep within the sediments of the seabed; we barely understand the roles that many of these organisms play in marine energy flow and nutrient cycling – roles which scientists now believe are essential to the stability of the planet (biologically and climatically). Yet, the EIA does not acknowledge this ignorance. It does not provide this as a valid reason – enshrined within the Precautionary Principle – to pull the plug on sediment mining off our coast.

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‘One spark and we’ll have another Piper Alpha on our hands’: Explosive gas leak from ‘well from hell’ threatens repeat of Britain’s deadliest rig disaster

Fears are growing that a single spark could lead to a repeat of Britain’s deadliest rig disaster. A huge toxic gas leak spewing from a North Sea oil well may lead to an explosion like that seen in the Piper Alpha disaster in 1988, it is claimed.Environmentalists have branded Total’s Elgin gas platform ‘the well from hell’ after the leak was discovered at the weekend. Total evacuated all 238 workers from its platform in the North Sea after the potentially disastrous discovery on Sunday.

An exclusion zone for ships and aircraft was set up around the evacuated rig in an attempt to prevent an explosion. But there are fears that a naked flame, located on the top of the leaking platform, could spark a massive explosion and lead to an environmental disaster.

Battle to plug the leak graphic

One spark could ignite the gas cloud – so big it can be seen eight miles away – above the platform.  Experts who admitted they still do not know the exact location of the leak or how much gas is emerging say it could take six months to fix.

Jake Molloy, regional organiser of the RMT union, said: ‘If the gas were to find an ignition source, this could lead to the same outcome as Piper Alpha.’

He added: ‘Total acted very swiftly in getting everyone off but the potential still exists for catastrophic devastation.

‘If the gas cloud somehow finds an ignition source we could be looking at complete destruction.

‘The emergency operation in the North Sea is unprecedented.’

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Hopes of big money in controversial seabed mine

KASM spokesperson Phil McGabe

Seabed mining pressure is mounting on Waikato’s west coast amid fears that it could damage the unique coastline and its endangered wildlife.

Trans-Tasman Resources has lodged two new exploration permits with NZ Petroleum and Minerals covering 333,090 hectares of ocean floor in a band that runs along the coast from the Awakino River mouth to Port Waikato and extends 12 nautical miles out to sea. It’s also exploring the South Taranaki Bight.

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New Website for KASM

It took us a while but we finally got around to it.

Our old website we knew was way past the sell by date but as it was also a treasure trove of research and information we were also hesitant to let it go but with the advent of the Asset sale eager National policies and the arrival of TTR (Trans Tasmanian Resource mining company) we knew we had to pull finger and get a new website up and running which would allow us to quickly update it with the latest on the Kasm against seabed mining actions and news connected to that. So without further ado here is a sneak peek of our New Website with an archived old website so none of the valuable information goes lost.

Let us know what you think!

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Mining protest on film

Via Vera

More than 100 people gathered at Raglan’s Ngarunui Beach on Sunday to take part in the filming of an anti-seabed mining protest video.
Supporters, many of them local residents, marched down the beach with picket signs while shouting slogans devised by the event’s organisers, Kiwis Against Seabed Mining (KASM).

More than 100 people showed up at Ngarunui Beach on Sunday to protest against seabed mining. Photo: Mackenzie McCarty
Phil McCabe, KASM member and part coordinator of the filming, said the purpose of the video was to inform the public about an issue which was largely being ignored.
“Everyone that hears about [seabed mining] – it stirs them,” he says, “This is to inform the New Zealand government and the mining companies that it is not going to happen.”

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Explosive gas cloud spewing from leaking ‘well from hell’ off British coast is growing and could take six months to stop, experts warn

A giant explosive cloud hanging over a North Sea rig could take six months to clear and may expand towards the Scottish coast, it was warned today.

The huge underwater reservoir tapped by oil giant Total’s Elgin platform, which sits 150 miles from Aberdeen, is known as the ‘well from hell’ because it is so difficult to plug.
An exclusion zone stretching up to four miles has been set up around the platform because it could explode.
The exact source of the leak is still a mystery but it is escaping out of the platform, which has pumped gas and oil to Britain for the past decade.
Total say they are considering a drilling relief well to divert the gas, which would be a safe way to end the crisis, but it could take up to six months.
A giant explosive cloud hanging over a North Sea rig could take six months to clear and may expand towards the Scottish coast, it was warned today.
The huge underwater reservoir tapped by oil giant Total’s Elgin platform, which sits 150 miles from Aberdeen, is known as the ‘well from hell’ because it is so difficult to plug.
An exclusion zone stretching up to four miles has been set up around the platform because it could explode.
The exact source of the leak is still a mystery but it is escaping out of the platform, which has pumped gas and oil to Britain for the past decade.
Total say they are considering a drilling relief well to divert the gas, which would be a safe way to end the crisis, but it could take up to six months.

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